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Joining forces to attack Kudzu

The Polk County Board of Commissioners has recently started a pilot project to help slow the spread of kudzu in the county. The county’s elected officials have created a modest matching grant program to assist organizations, towns and other recognized groups with the kudzu eradication projects. The first project to be cost shared is an effort initiated by the Harmon Field Commission.

This summer’s perfect growing conditions have unfortunately helped kudzu spread along the greenway at Harmon Field. Left unchecked, these new patches of kudzu could easily get out of control. Because of the proximity of the kudzu to the river, Harmon Field will contract with a company that will use special aquatic herbicides specifically formulated for use along waterways. Timing is critical and efforts are underway to complete the work by October 11th before the onset of frost. 

“We are very pleased to partner with the Harmon Field Commission,” said Joe Cooper, chairman of the Polk County Appearance Commission. “Thanks to our county commissioners we have some additional funds to aid groups with their kudzu eradication efforts. The county board has asked the Appearance Commission to review the applications and help find other eradication projects to cost share. We are fortunate to have Appearance Commission board member Karen Bird and special volunteer Greg Miner lead the effort for the Appearance Commission.”

The grant funds for Harmon Field are in the amount of $1,825. This is a 50 / 50 match as required by the pilot county program. This eradication effort will treat approximately four acres.

Interested groups are encouraged to complete an application for this grant program. Applications are available on the Appearance Commission website, beautifulfoothills.org under the heading Grants. Timing for this project is critical.

Submitted by the Polk County Appearance Commission